About your Search

20131028
20131105
STATION
ALJAZAM 19
CNNW 11
WHUT (Howard University Television) 8
KCSM (PBS) 5
MSNBC 5
MSNBCW 5
CSPAN 4
LINKTV 4
CNBC 3
KNTV (NBC) 3
KQED (PBS) 3
CSPAN2 2
WETA 2
FBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 80
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 82 (some duplicates have been removed)
of revelations by former nsa analyst, edward snowden. documents he leaked showed phone calls of millions of ordinary citizens. testimony of keith alexander and others told the committee the content is secret in a lock box unless there is a link to terrorism. that, they say, is rare. >> it would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulate suspicion that we had connection to a foreign al qaeda or related terrorist group, and look into that box. in 2002 we had 288 such selectors that we could go and look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the committee hearing there was relatively little discussion about allegations the u.s. spied on america's allies. at the white house it was a hot topic. prote press secretary jay carney said president obama assured angela merkel that there was not and will not be spying on her. >> this is what he said about france and spain. >> i have no information. >> senator dianne fienstein says she does not think it is proper for america to spy on the leaders of allied nation. the white house ordered a top to bottom review o
about the meeting with edward snowden and the letter to the government. edward snowden be willing to talk to german investigators or politicians or even come to germany to be interviewed? he could come to germany if it were guaranteed that he would be secure in germany or a comparable country. the green and the left party want to question snowden about u.s. surveillance activity. he could be offered asylum or safe passage in return. christian democrats it would exacerbate tensions with washington. one alternative being discussed is to meet with snowden in moscow. usif snowden was to provide with information, we will take that into consideration. verification or new information would be a good thing. -- not is nothing something the u.s. would be likely to find good. it reiterated its position on snowden on friday. which he iss with charged are serious. our view that the right thing to do is for him to return or be returned to the united states to face those charges. german government is in a tricky situation. how can they find out more about u.s. espionage without deepening the dip
from spain. this is based on documents provided by edward snowden. >> arriving for an uncomfortable meeting, the u.s. ambassador in major it has questions to answer after a spanish newspaper published elite documents showing u.s. intelligence services tracked more than 60 million phone calls made in spain between december and january of this year. a massive 3.5 million calls in one day. they say the monitoring appears to track where the calls were made and how long they lasted, but not their content. the spanish government has demanded full details about what information was collected from their citizens. >> as always, we learn about what is going on after it has happened. that is how it is with american intelligence. they are always ahead of us. >> it is a disgrace they are spying on governments and ministers. we will see what happens, but to me, this is a very serious violation. >> it comes after the prime rejected calls for an eu wide no-spying agreement. they wanted more information before supporting the special arrangement with the united states. he white house has denied that
on information from edward snowden, following allegations that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. the white house denies that. congressman peter king and former vice president dick chaney said the u.s. should stop apologising for the nsa surveillancism. >> overall intelligence is important and need to be preserved. >> the reality is the nsa saved thousands of lives, not just in the united states, but france and germany and throughout europe. the french are ones to talk - the fact is they've carried out spying against the united states - both government and industry. >> jeanne shaheen of new hampshire takes a different stance, calling on the nsa to come clean about surveillance programs. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we've listened in. we have repair twork do. we have hard questions we need to ask of the nsa about what is happening in the program. >> meanwhile -
edward snowden may have information about how much cooperation european governments gave to the surveillance. >> as they wrap up meetings on capitol hill, what are they saying after the first meeting emerges. >> reporter: this is part of an european inquiry set up a few months ago. this has been long planned. the first stop at chairman of the house intelligence mike rogers who said he didn't understand what all the fuss was about, that they should be glad europe is spying on them because its keeping them safe. not much there. there is talk of ongoing dialogue but the chairman of european union foreign affairs has said confidence has been damaged. >> has anything been said that their spying headquarters have been linked so they can share the spy information. >> reporter: that's the big question, what we haven't learned from the edward snowden is the amount of cooperation from the european governments and the national security agency. this is something that they have been very concerned about. as far as world leaders who are talking about things, angela merkel and so on, yo
on other nations, especially our allies and friends. it's all coming from one man, edward snowden and the secrets he made off before he left as a u.s. intelligence analyst. now the white house is scrambling to soothe feelings while fielding questions about how much the president knew. we begin in washington tonight with nbc's andrea mitchell. andrea, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the white house is under fire from its closest allies. for the first time the president is promising to limit the nsa's extraordinary reach saying what they are able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. that likely means not spying on foreign leaders who happen to be good friends and allies. across europe, an uproar today. the u.s. ambassador to spain under siege. called on the carpet to explain reports that the nsa was vacuuming up telephone data, tracking 60 million calls in spain in less than a month according to el mundo. germany today called for an investigation into nsa's tapping of angela merkel's personal cell phone. the interior minister said the chancellor
's aw at this hour, star with the latest leak from former nsa contractor edward snowden. says theington post" national security agency has been hacking be data links that connect google and yahoo! around the world. laways the agency skirt the by collecting data from millions of local web users via underwater fiber-optic cables. kate moody explains. >> world leaders, foreign citizens, and internet giants, the latest victims of the national security agency's surveillance programs according to intelligence linked by edward snowden. the nsa has admitted to the program to access internet user accounts but described new reports that infiltrated yahoo! and google databases as factually incorrect. breakings not an essay into any databases. it would be illegal for us to do that. -- does collect information on terrorists and our national intelligence priorities, but we are not authorized to go into a u.s. company's servers and take data. we have to go to a court process for doing that. >> but the "washington post" says there is more to the story, reporting details of a separate over program-- nsa
if edward snowden lost sean penn, he has to many can be hasn't lost me. >> any concerns? >> i don't know what's in his mind. i don't know what he's doing now. he might be in a hot tub with two russian strippers named i want to drink a lot. he's done some service, getting us to at least debate the issue and as far as stuff gone on the last week or so with the european allies being up sit, i can understand if they felt their personal cell phones were being tapped. but on the other hand, they should really climb a little bit. it's been 60, 70 years since america defended allies, especially in europe. we liberated europe twice in the last century. they never wanted to pay the premiums for being protected. cut us a little slack when we protect you. the 9/11 plot was hatched in germany. there are much more restive muslim populations on the european continent than here. we over do it all. there is no doubt about that. cut us slack for the protection we've given you-all this time. >> that could be an endorsement of what the nsa has been doing and what you said about edward snowden. so where do y
spied on by there were reports of him coming from edward snowden. and then a separate report in the el mound doe newspaper indicated that some 60 million people in spain, as well as 35 world leaders. their phones being tapped. giving some rather interesting numbers that have not been disclosed before. he said that their mission began on september 11th which is a reframe that has been heard time and time again, as this debate raged on, he said that on that day, 2,996 people were killed on september 11th, but here is the part that is that public has never heard before, he said that 20 beam from the nsa have been killed fighting what is called the war on terrorism, since then, and that 6,000 people from the nsa were deployed i guess to gather intelligence. he says there has not been a mass casualty in this country since 2001, he says that is not by luck, they have not stopped trying. he also points out that they have stopped 13 incidents in the united states, another 25 incidents across europe. anyclapper also saying he believes that we have been lawful, with regards to what has been taki
for wednesday. >> nsa whistleblower edward snowden has been charged with espionage. but he wants to be let off the hook saying they are looking to criminalize a local speech in a letter friday the northbounding sa whistleblower asked for international hope to persuade the us to give him clemency. >> he violated u.s. law. he should return to the united states and face justice. >> snowden has also indicated that he would like to testify before congress withoabout the surveillance program but lawmakers wonsay that won't hap either. >> houston taking on the colts. the texans were rolling through the first half. andre johnson pulls in his third touchdown of the game. texans up 21-3. what we told you about texan's head coach gary kubiak collapsing it's down there from houston they go on to drop their 6th straight. 27-24. raider rs taking on the eagles. it was the colts the eagles quarterback shutting down the raider's defense for a record tieing 7 touchdown passes. connecting with riley cooper for three of his 7 touchdowns. finishing the became 406 yards, 7 touchdowns no interceptions. >> it was a d
. >>> and edward snowden says british counterparts to the nsa are some of the worst offenders to government oversight. >>> welcome to "around the world." police came within minutes of stopping the alleged l.a.x. shooter from heading to the airport before friday's rampage. one. new details we're learning today. this is from an exclusive interview with a woman who knows the suspect and his three roommates. 23-year-old paul ciancia is charged with murdering a tsa officer. ciancia is in critical condition after being shot by police officers. the fbi says he set out to kill tsa employees, and now a woman who knows the suspect tells our miguel marquez, that one roommate, who had no idea what was going on, even drove him to the airport. >> he asked one of the roommates if he could have a ride to the airport. >> why did he need a ride? >> he said he was going back home. either that his dad was kind of sick and he had to deal with some family issues. >> did anyone ever see a ticket? >> no. >> he did mention what day. that morning, he doesn't knock and says, i need to leave. can you take me now. >> d
. >> the work of the n.s.a. is under fire, because of revelations by former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the n.s.a. has been collecting phone calls and text messages of millions of american citizens. the author of the patriot act has proposed a new law called the freedom act aimed at ending the sweeping phone tapping program. the act would stop drag net collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and appoint a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights. national security director told the committee the content of phone calls remain secret, in a virtual lock box unless there is a link to possible terrorism and that he says is rare. >> they would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulatable suspicion that we had connection to a foreign or al-qaeda terrorists group and look into that box. in 2012, we had 288 such selectors that we could go and look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the hearing, there was relatively little discussion a
almost all based on information leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden suggest the u.s. has been spying on many countries and their leaders, including important u.s. allies. >> the white house denies the report that president obama knew the n.s.a. was eavesdropping on german leader angela merkel. we have the latest. >> a nine member delegation will meet with senior government officials over allegations of widespread spying against leaders. new allegations surfaced that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. according to the wall street journal, the president was unaware the n.s.a. was spying on world leaders and ordered the agency to stop some of the monitoring programs after learning of them. >> the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> it's not just the europeans who are upset. over the weekend, thousands marched on washington to express their outrage. >> against mass surveillance and i'm truly honored to speak for all whistle blowers. >> some memb
, edward snowden, who said agents had been secretly gathering the phone and internet data of private citizens. u.s. officials tell "the wall street journal" that american agents have suspended spying on merkel and other world loaders, but they say the agency is still monitoring other leaders because some of the programs are producing useful intelligence. >>> smoke in tiananmen square after a car burst into flames. chinese authorities are staying tight-lipped about the deadly incident. here's more. >> reporter: a car on fire, smoke in the air. these photos show the aftermath of the monday afternoon incident in tiananmen square. i'm now passing the beijing tiananmen square. the authorities are working in this area. there is no one except for armed police in the square. the crash occurred on the north side of the square close to the entrance to the forbidden city. the spot is home to a giant portrait of mao tse tung. the news agency said a sports utility vehicle traveled a few hundred meters, then smashed into a low barrier. three people inside the suv died. two tourists have also died.
they took place. they cited classified documents by edward snowden and the spanish law prohibits the collecting of such information without permission. u.s. leaders have been scrambling to reassure their allies after a swrooishs of allegations about spying. a french newspaper said u.s. acts intercepted more than 17 million phone calls and e-mails in france in a one-month period. german newspaper said monitor chancellor angela merkel's mobile phone for more than ten years. >>> officials in north korea have told nhk they plan to keep a program running that has given people in japan emotional closure. they say they will continue to allow japanese to visit places where their loved ones died. more than 38,000 japanese died in the northern part of the korean peninsula around the end of world war ii. the remains of two-thirds of them are thought to be buried there. nhk world's hiromitsu nagano recently accompanied a group that went to pay respects. >> reporter: three japanese grieved relatives arrived in pyongyang last thursday. one of them was 78-year-old tsuneaki iwata from tokyo. >>
eavesdropped on their voicemails. >>> edward snowden could earn a ticket out of russia if we agrees to testify about the u.s. and its spying. german lawmakers are investigating reports that the u.s. tapped angela merkel's cell phone, and they said they would grant snowden asylum if he would be their star witness. >>> the case of a little girl named maria living in a greek roman community, has thrust the roma people back into the spot light. claudio lavanga has the story. >> reporter: miriana halilovic likes to welcome guests with coffee, but she is forced to serve it outdoors. inside the trailer she calls home there is barely space for her new-born twins. she hopes to be relocated to a social public housing are quickly fading away. >> reporter: they say i'm roma is for italian. but i'm an italian citizen too. i have a right to a decent home. >> reporter: she is one of more than 4,000 members of the roma community who live in overcrowded camps infested by rats. bouts of hepatitis a and other diseases, the air is filled with the smell of burning rubbish. this camp was built to house 600 people,
nsa contractor edward snowden. the reports say by tapping into the links, the nsa has positioned itself to collect at will data from hundreds of millions of users' accounts, this would include emails sent and received, as well as content such as texts, audio and video. the "post" says during the 30-day period up to january 9th of this year, the nsa used the links to collect more than 180 million new records. google said it is outraged at the lengths to which the government seems to have gone to intercept data from the firm's private fiber network. the nsa chief general keith alexander has denied the allegations. he said the report is incorrect and that his organization obtains court orders before collecting necessary information. google and yahoo! user accounts through a court-approved process. the post's report suggesting other means could intensify criticism of the u.s. government. >>> once again officials in taiwan say a magnitude 6.3 earthquake hit the island's east coast. we don't know whether there has been damage the or casualties. taiwan's central weather bureau says the
national security agency contractor edward snowden is prepared to reveal what he knows. german media say opposition lawmaker traveled to moscow to meet with snowden. he says snowden told him that he's ready to speak to german prosecutors and members of parliament. they are looking into allegations american agents tapped the cell phone of chancellor angela merkel. strobel says snowden made it clear he knows a lot. snowden has revealed details of several top u.s. surveillance programs. u.s. leaders are demanding the russian officials return him to the u.s. so he can face charges of espionage and theft of government property. >>> germany has criticized the apparent spying operation against merkel. now u.s. secretary of state john kerry admitted some of the spying activities were inappropriate, but stopping short of clarifying the details. kerry spoke to a conference in london via video link on thursday. >> some of these actions have reached too far, and we are going to make sure that does not happen in the future. >> but he defended u.s. intelligence gathering, saying it has stopped numerou
to talk directly to the former u.s. intelligence operative edward snowden about the nsa's spying activities. >> if the message is that mr. snowden wants to provide us with information and tell us something, then we will gladly accept that. because any clarification, information, and fax we can obtain is a good thing -- and facts we can obtain is a good thing. >> the announcement came after a politician returned from russia with a letter from snowden, offering to give sworn testimony on u.s. spying activities directed at german citizens and leaders. he held a surprise three-hour meeting with snowden in russia on thursday night. snowden reportedly offered to give testimony in germany, but his lawyer said a meeting could only take race and russia -- take place in russia for legal reasons. snowden would have a lot to say to the german people. >> also on friday, germany became the first european country to allow a third gender option for newborn babies. under the new law, babies born with characteristics of both sexes will no longer have to be registered as male or female. many inters
classified documents provided by former nsa contractor edward snowden. spanish government officials summoned the u.s. ambassador for an explanation. spanish law prohibits the collecting of such information without permission. >>> german media are reporting that agents also bugged chancellor angela merkel's phone. u.s. officials have not denied the allegation but say no such surveillance is taking place now. they say they're conducting a review of their intelligence gathering methods. >> i noted the other day a readout from a phone call the president had with chancellor merkel made clear that we do not and will not monitor the chancellor's communications. >> carney said last summer president barack obama ordered a comprehensive review of how the u.s. gathers intelligence. he said the investigation should be completed by the end of the year. defense secretary chuck hagel says the allegations do not reflect a lack of respect. >> we have great respect for our partners, our allies, who cooperate with us and we cooperate with them to try to keep the world safe, to keep each other safe, to keep our
contractor edward snowden is willing to help an investigation into claims that chancellor merkel's mobile phone was monstered by -- monitored by u.s. investigation. he said the contractor is even willing to travel to germany. though his lawyer had just said he will not be able to leave russia. when i asked her correspondent in berlin, first, a practical question. how the germans managed to meet snowden in russia. >> that, we do not know but i gather he went with a german journal, clearly, very secretly done -- journalist, clearly very secretly done. in about two hours, he will reveal exactly what was said by the fugitive in moscow, but in the meantime, the m.p. has put on his own website pictures of the two. and one of the pictures shows the two of them having what seems like a pretty relaxed meal , white linen tablecloth. but what's significant is mr. snowden seems to be laughing. it does seem to a pretty relaxed event. and what you were alluding to earlier, a promise, according to him that mr. snowden would come to germany to take part in an investigation into spying activities. if the
contractor edward snowden. the spying allegations have forced officials in the white house to promise changes to how they gather information. >>> u.s. forces are trying to break up a group of militants in east africa linked to al qaeda. they've killed two members of al shabaab in a drone strike. the militant group is based in southern somalia. interior ministry officials there said two of its members
contractor edward snowden despite u.s. objections. the chien naeetz president placd third. >>> government leaders have complicated peace talks with palestinians just after they got going again. they approved a plan to obuild more new homes in occupied territory. united nations officials say the settlements are a violation of international law. but the israelis continue building plans. they started talks in july after a three-year hiatus, but palestinian leaders say they're not taking the process seriously. >> if they want to continue settlements, as everyone can sigh, it neens that there is no possibility of a two-state solution. >>> israeli leaders have released dozens of palestinian prisoners as part of the agreement to restart the talks. they just freed another 26 inmates in a gesture of goodwill. that angered some right wing politicians and citizens. some say israeli leaders approved of the new settlements in an effort to 'peas the hard liners. >>> german intelligence leaders have gone to the white house asking for an explanation. they want to know more about reports that u.s. agents
contractor, edward snowden. >> the national security agency took the unusual step thursday of denying a report that'ves drop on the vatican phone calls and may have tapped in on pope francis before he was elected. what are you making up? is this a church, state issue? >> you got in on the consistent, the ones that depict the new pope, john? >> who knows. saved a lot of money. those guys have not done anything that was not known to the national security council and the white house and the idea of blaming these guys who are doing the job they were signed to do and oh my goodness, for miss feinstein, that there's a touch of hypocrisy here. >> there's a lot of outrage. i'm with clapper on this issue as well. i mean, i think because of the technological advances and the fact that we can now, you know, look in on people's cell phones, that you know, there has to be some more guidelines brought into this thing. but overall, friends spy on friends, it's not going to stop. >> what do you think of that? >> i think, well, i'm not enough people, clearly. there's no doubt that this has been g
will continue through the middle of next year and be the major issue. >> i predict edward snowden's revelations of widespread u.s. eves dropping on top european leaders will derail president obama's u.s., europe, free trade talks. 35 of them. bye bye. >> rose: welcome to the program, tonight a former chairman of the federal reserve, alan greenspan, his new book is called the map and the territory, risk human nature and the future of forecasting. >> i was already a economist but i was also what is known as a logical massachusettsiveist -- positivist which says if you can't measure it, it doesn't exist. that spritd me from the understanding how humans behavior, the irrational is not worth doing. she demonstrated to me that i was wrong. that didn't have a full effect immediately but it grew on me. and i look back now and i think some of my views involved in recent years to fall back on if i was stillwnhi wouldn't read t. >> rose: we conclude this evening with david kelly and his brother tom kelly. they have written a new book called creative confidence. >> i'm thinking is that methodology that
on the surveillance program. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden, and secrets that are revealed are doing damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, mexico and other countries where the suggestion is that we've lisped in -- listened in. i think we have repair work to do and hard questions it ask of the nsa about what is happening in the program. >> it's a different view from the chairman of the house homeland security committee. congressman peter king says america should stop apologising for the nas. >> the reality is the nsa saved thousands of lives - not just the united states, but france, germany and throughout europe. the french carried out spying operations ai gaips the united states -- against the united states. as far as germany - that's where the hamburg plot began laing to nchb -- leading to 9/11. >> former secretary of state madeleine albright agrees, saying the u.s. is not the only one that spies on world leaders, but says france listened to her calls. a french ambassador once ask her about something she said on a private call. madeleine albright said: >> a roadside bo
is that these reports were based on the misreading of a single slide released by edward snowden. and that slide showing these numbers in millions and so on. but in fact, the nsa collected no information in europe. they say that any information, i in of this meta data, that's with a it was. not phone call or conten was done by european services, not by the nsa. that it was not in fact the citizens of those countries, france and spain, but collected from a number of sources by the u.s. and nato allies in support of military operations abroad. here's how they made that case at the hearings today. >> the assertions by spain, italy, that nsa collected ten of million of phone call are completely false. to be perfectly clear, this is not information that we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> so in effect, they're saying that one of the strongest reasons for this anger we've been seeing from europe started with nothing. the misinterpretation, erin, of a single power point slid
these stories when they come out, what does this new revelation from edward snowden from nsa reveal what the agency has been up to. >> the way that you just introduced that is crucial, right? because virtually every one of these stories, the day that it comes out, everybody pulls out their hair, runs around, i can't believe this is happening. this is crazy and then quietly over the next couple days we get revisions to the story. sometimes we get wholesale rewrites of the story and they don't appear to be anything like what they whrp they were first broken. we did that with the story we discussed here on the panel one night when it came out "the washington post" broke the story originally and then it had to be basically rewritten a couple days later. we have seen the same thing with the stories about the united states vacuuming up virtually every phone call across europe turns out that wasn't true. partners in europe were involved in that turns out they probably about most of the vacuuming for us. i'm reluctant to offer any kind of definitive take on what this means until we know that it
, thanks to his source, former nsa contractor edward snowden, who is now hold up in russia, but the hits keep coming from him. the diplomatic impact kicked up an order of magnitude, though, over reports from the german paper that german chancellor angela merkel's personal phone, her cell phone, had also been bugged by the nsa after a direct, and i'm guessing kind of brusk call between the chancellor and president obama, the white house released a statement saying that the president "assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of chancellor merkel." is not and will not in the future. those are the key phrases here. so, we're not doing it now and we won't going forward, but did we in the past? >> has the united states monitored the chancellor's phone calls in the past? >> nedra, we are not going to publicly comment on every piece of policy and we have made clear that the united states gathers foreign intelligence of the type gathered by all nations. >> so, no comment on the past. we don't still do it, we won't do it again, but why
made by former nsa contractor edward snowden. he describes himself as a whistleblower, but others say he's a traitor. >> christiane amanpour has spoken with the journalist who worked closely with edward snowden to expose these secrets and joins you now from london. you had that interview with glenn greenwald. what struck you most about him, he is one determined man on a bit of a mission really. >> he continues to insist that despite the vociferous criticism that officials have leveled at the snowden leaks and at him and the press for publishing them, it is not all about terrorism. he keeps saying loorks, they want us to believe that everything that's being leaked is just about life and death terrorism. but it's not. there are a lot of other revelations, a lot of revelations about economic and commercial and industrial espionage. there are a lot of revelations obviously which started the firestorm of protests around the world. about spying and collecting metadata from ordinary citizens. that is what really drives glen green wald really, really crazy and let me play you just a little bi
information from whistle blower edward snowden may emerge detailing cooperation and the dragnet surveillance of citizens, if not the monitoring of leaders' phone calls. >> that delegation will be in washington until wednesday. we are also expecting delegations from the french and german intelligence agencies at some point in the coming days and weeks. the question is whether they are truly concerned about the surveillance of their citizens or the surveillance of their leaders, political and business. >> we have reports that there'll be more talks on spying held in europe. >> tens of millions of twitter users around the world are expressing their thoughts in 140 characters or less. many want to the crackdown on the growing hate speech on the social media platform. we have this story. >> twitter is becoming a favourite spot for tech-savvy hate monningers. that's according to a report by a center in international human rights. the center gave twitter an f grade when it came to policing the hate messages on its fight. >> facebook was the best to deal with issues. twitter was the worst. we. the
correct because of some of the issues that edward snowden has been able to put out. their mission lately has been to try to make the american people more aware of the terrorist plots that have been foiled because of their action. over theseen red chili summer and even this week general alexander and director clapper be more forthright over the plot that have been foiled third if you count europe, it gets into the couple dozen area. that is something we have to be able to put out there to give reassurance to people like your that the intelligence community are doing all they can to protect us from international terrorism. host: our guest, michael allen, managing director of beacon global strategies, author of "blinking red -- crisis and compromise in american intelligence after 9/11." former majority staff, other position similar to that as well. south carolina, democrat line. caller: hi, pedro. i had a comment and a question for mr. allen. you are uniquely qualified to answer my question. that ient is added up is am a retired master sergeant, and the phrase plausible deniability -- that
worker edward snowden, revelations that the nsa spied on germany's chancellor angela merkel have proadvocated outrage in the country. >>> french police have released a sketch of a man wanted for the murder of a family in the alps, a shooting that is still unexplained. >>> a dutch children's rights organization is warning of what it describes as an e epidemic of youngsters being forced to perform sexual acts. handed those names to interpol. >> she is the weapon against sex traffic, she is not real. prowling the web for sex, one group trying to end it all. these are some of the men who have been identified as terrorists. researchers log on to chattel rooms pretending to be young girls. within seconds they are being offered money in return for things we cannot repeat. >> whenever i open a chat room dozens of men swarm at me within minutes. from families, good jobs, they're athletes, it's unbelievable how diverse the pattern is. >> this is one of the chat rooms the team are using. 10 f philippines. ten years old, female, philippines. we deliberately kept the camera a little bit far a
n.s.a. contractor edward snowden suggests that the nation's biggest tech companies are being breached, too. and as far as we know, it's all legal. is that right, tom? >> well, that's being debated. and i'm not a lawyer. so i sort of deal with things on a dumbed down level. gwen: ok. do that. >> there's one rule that basically underlies all the law here. which is you can't spy on americans without a court order. gwen: right. >> but apparently you can spy on foreigners. and that's what these latest rounds of disclosures have involved. whether it's spying on angela merkel or in this case the n.s.a. found a way to intercept the data as it was transiting through data links into data centers that were held by google and yahoo in europe. so the argument would seem to be, the legal argument would seem to be because those data centers are in europe, they're not -- they can assume they're not american data. therefore, it was legal to go in. however, the data companies, google and yahoo, are absolutely furious about this. for various reasons. one of them is that their reputations have n
snowden' snowden's snowdd edward cameron's are are answer was this. >> i don't want to use the tougher measures. i think it's better to appeal to the social responsibility, it will be difficult for government to stand back and not to act. >> ing earlier in the houses of parliament. comments being made in spain as well today. >> the ramifications of the leaks, the nsa and the gchq are annoying governments all around the world. spain is the latest. its foreign minister has said revelations will suffer and actions will be taken on their behalf so they're clearly not happy about what's going on. >> you've had a busy day, talk about it i guess you could call it a spying scandal in the u.k, concerns media, newspapers and a hacking trial. i know you were in court earlier for that. >> yes, this has been going on for years as far as i can remember. this is a scandal which involves british newspapers and what they would do over a period of a decade, and two figures that are quite well-known in british public life, re rebecca brooks,d andy corson former editor of news of the world. they and six o
that several agency across asia were part of the spying. >> edward snowden wants to help germany figure out if the u.s. tapped angela merkel's cell phone. he offered to help with the investigation and even offered to be a witness. the official says "he knows a lot." he is prepared to come to germ my and give testimony. the official says snowden insists that before coming to germany, "conditions must be discussed." he sent the a personal letter to merkel, which will be red publicly today. >> powerful storms pound the parts of ohio. >> the severe weather is expected to last through tonight, as well. ten people were injured. strong winds damages businesses and downed power lines. the storm caused flash floods on wednesday in sections of texas that left two dead. tornado warnings have been issued, high went gusts are also expected in new york and new england. >> let's bring in our meteorologist. >> very busy system here. what can we expect. >> very busy, we have close to 200 reports, five being tornadoes, close to 150 being wind reports, and also multiple reports of hail across much of the coun
for edward snowden says he now has a job in the country where he's seeking asylum. beginning tomorrow, snowden will work for a major russian website where he will be performing maintenance. for security reasons, his attorney isn't naming the employer. snowden is charged with espionage and theft of government property. >>> a secret service report detailing chris brown's alleged assault assault of a man here in washington, d.c. is shedding new light on the possibility defense strategy. the document obtained by cnn suggests that brown's bodyguard could take the rap for the broken nose, while lawyers could question the credibility of one of the police officers investigating the case. brown is currently serving felony probation for his 2009 domestic violence conviction involving the pop star rihanna. a big day here in washington for the new new jersey senator, the former mayor cory booker was sworn in by the vice president joe biden. later met privately with president obama over at the white house. there was a special election this month to serve out the term of the late democratic senator
mundo is getting the information from edward snowden. comes from claims that president obama knew about and improved spying on angela merkel. not true. house and homeland security, says the house should stop apologizing for the nsa, and dick cheney agreed. >> important to the security of the nation and need to be preserved. >> the reality is the nsa has saved thousands of lives not only the united states but in france and germany and throughout europe. the french are ones to talk. the fact is they carried out spying operations against united states both the government and industry. >> a much different thought though from democratic senator jean sheheen. she called for the government to come clean about its surveillance program. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral ription relationshipsh germany with mexico with the other countries where the suggestion is we've listened in. so i think we have repair work to do and we have hard questions we need to ask about the nsa about what is really happening in t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 82 (some duplicates have been removed)